Movieland Mystery Photo (Updated + + + +)

Jan. 21, 2017, Mystery Photo
This week’s mystery movie has been the 1965 film “Chimes at Midnight.” It is available from the Criterion collection on DVD and Blu-ray, and also released in bargain versions sold at Wal-Mart.

By all means read E. Yarber’s insightful daily comments on Orson Welles’ “Chimes,” which I have been reading all week and are now public. Yarber also offered extended commentary on Roger Corman’s “A Bucket of Blood” last August and I salute anyone who is equally at home discussing Welles and Corman.

Jan. 16, 2017, Mystery Photo

For Monday, we have a mystery woman.

Update: This is Margaret Rutherford.

Jan 17. 2017, Mystery Photo

 

For Tuesday, we have a mystery gent. And armor.

Update: This is Norman Rodway.

A note to those of you who thought Monday’s mystery woman was too easy. I try to keep the mystery movies varied: a silent one week, a musical the next, followed by a film noir, a pre-code, a foreign film, etc. This is one of the latest films I have ever done (I think the latest film ever to appear is “Closely Watched Trains,” also from the 1960s.) and it is gratifying to see how many people recognize this film from one image. It’s also nice to add a few newcomers to the Brain Trust. Welcome!

Brain Trust roll call: Howard Mandelbaum (mystery movie, mystery woman), Bob Hansen (mystery movie, mystery woman), Anne Papineau (mystery movie, mystery woman), Timothy (mystery woman), moviepas (mystery woman), Mary Mallory (mystery movie, mystery woman), Tucson Barbara (mystery movie, mystery woman — get better!), Norman Desmond (mystery woman), Jenny M (mystery movie, mystery woman), Robert Morrisey (mystery woman), June (mystery woman), Benito (mystery woman), LC (mystery woman), Don Danard (mystery woman), Meridel1 (mystery woman), David Inman (mystery woman), Mandy Marie (mystery woman), Arye Michael Bender (mystery movie, mystery woman), Patricia van Hartesveldt (mystery woman), Chrisbo (mysery woman), Rick (mystery woman), Sue Slutzky (mystery woman), Floyd Thursby (mystery woman), Lee Ann Megan and Thom (mystery woman), Sarah (mystery movie and mystery woman), Earl Boebert (mystery movie, mystery woman), McDee (mystery movie, mystery woman), Roget-L.A. (mystery movie), SylviaE (mysetry woman), Howard Decker (mystery woman), Cary Moore (mystery woman), Patrick (mystery movie, mystery woman) and Candy Cassell (mystery woman).

Jan. 18, 2017, Mystery Photo

And for Wednesday, we have this mystery gent, plus diverse mystery companions.

Update: This is Keith Baxter.

Brain Trust roll call: Brain Trust roll call: Mary Mallory (Tuesday’s mystery gent), Charles Kjelland (Monday’s mystery woman), Anne Papineau (Tuesday’s mystery woman), Sue Slutzky (mystery movie and Tuesday’s mystery guest), Mandy Marie (mystery movie and Tuesday’s mystery guest), Dan Nather (mystery movie and Monday’s mystery woman), Mike Hawks (mystery movie and Monday’s mystery guest), Tucson Barbara (Tuesday’s mystery guest), Chrisbo (mystery movie), Howard Mandelbaum (reading our minds with Wednesday’s mystery guest), Dewey Webb (mystery movie and Monday’s mystery woman) and Victor H. Brown (Monday’s mystery woman).

Jan. 19, 2017, Mystery Photo

For Thurfday, we have a myftery wench. Ye can ignore Back of Ye Hedde Guy or notte, as ye wish.

Update: This is an intimate moment with Mrs. Hotspur (Marina Vlady) and Hotspur — either Norman Rodway or someone else acting as a stand-in as Back of Ye Hedde Guy. Welles apparently used many stand-ins while filming “Chimes” to keep his budget low.

Brain Trust roll call: Mary Mallory (Wednesday’s mystery guest), B.J. Merholz (mystery movie), Mike Hawks (Wednesday’s mystery guest), Roget-L.A. (mystery movie, Wednesday’s mystery guest), Anne Papineau (Wednesday’s mystery guest), Tucson Barbara (Wednesday’s mystery guest),  Howard Mandelbaum (Wednesday’s mystery guest, alas I’m afraid not on Tuesday’s guest), E. Yarber (mystery movie and guests, plus a nice little essay on the film), Patrick (Tuesday’s and Wednesday’s mystery guests) and L.C. (mystery movie and cast).

image

For Friday, we have…

Update: Orson Wells.

image

… and also…

Update: Keith Baxter and Sir John Gielgud (who also played dead in “The Loved One.”)

Brain Trust roll call: Tucson Barbara (Thursday’s mystery wench/Sir Back of Ye Hedde Guy), Mary Mallory (Thursday’s mystery wench), Anne Papineau (Thursday’s mystery wench), Mike Hawks (Thursday’s mystery wench), E. Yarber (Thursday’s mystery wench and an interesting essay, do come back Saturday to read it!) and Patrick (Sir Back of Ye Hedde Guy, wrong mystery wench). Alas poor Chrisbo! Alas poor Sue Slutzky! They are cast members, but not mystery guests, save Friday’s corpulent liar and wastrel.

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About lmharnisch

I work at the Los Angeles Times
This entry was posted in Film, Hollywood, Mystery Photo and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

91 Responses to Movieland Mystery Photo (Updated + + + +)

  1. Howard Mandelbaum says:

    Margaret Rutherford in Chimes at Midnight.

    Like

  2. Bob Hansen says:

    It’s Margaret Rutherford in Chimes at Midnight, from 1964.

    Like

  3. Anne Papineau says:

    Margaret Rutherford?

    Like

  4. Anne Papineau says:

    “Chimes at Midnight”

    Like

  5. Timothy says:

    Margaret Rutherford?

    Like

  6. moviepas says:

    Margaret Rutherford

    Like

  7. Mary Mallory says:

    Margaret Rutherford.

    Like

  8. tucsonbarbara says:

    Margaret Rutherford in “Chimes at Midnight” ?

    Like

  9. B.J.Merholz says:

    Varvara Massalitinova

    Like

  10. margaret rutherford?

    Like

  11. Jenny M says:

    Margaret Rutherford

    Like

  12. Robert Morrissey says:

    None other than Margaret Rutherford!

    Like

  13. June says:

    The wonderful Margaret Rutherford!

    Like

  14. Jenny M says:

    Movie is Chimes at Midnight.

    Like

  15. Benito says:

    A rather medieval Margaret Rutherford, who I just saw in THE VIPS

    Like

  16. LC says:

    Margaret Rutherford

    Like

  17. Don Danard says:

    Margaret Rutherford in one of her “Miss Marple” films.

    Like

  18. Meridel1 says:

    Looks like Margaret Rutherford

    Like

  19. David Inman says:

    Margaret Rutherford?

    Like

  20. mandymarie20 says:

    Watch out Margaret Rutherford!

    Like

  21. aryedirect says:

    The redoubtable, Margaret Rutherford. Still my favorite Miss Marple. The picture might be from Orson’Welles’ delightful ‘Chimes At Midnight’.

    Like

  22. Patricia van Hartesveldt says:

    Margaret Rutherford

    Like

  23. Chrisbo says:

    Margaret Rutherford would seem to easy for a Monday.

    Like

  24. Rick says:

    Dame Margaret Rutherford

    Like

  25. Sue Slutzky says:

    It’s Margaret Rutherford

    Like

  26. Floyd Thursby says:

    Margaret Rutherford in “Hideout in the Alps” perhaps?

    Like

  27. Lee Ann, Megan, and Thom says:

    Margaret Rutherford in Chimes at Midnight.

    Like

  28. Sarah says:

    I’ll guess Dame Margaret Rutherford in “Chimes at Midnight” (1965), which is probably too easy for a Monday.

    Like

  29. Earl Boebert says:

    Margaret Rutherford, Chimes at Midnight

    Like

  30. mcdee says:

    For Monday Margaret Rutherford in Chimes at Midnight

    Like

  31. Rogét-L.A. says:

    Margaret Rutherford

    Like

  32. SylviaE says:

    It looks like Margaret Rutherford.

    Like

  33. Howard Decker says:

    Looks like Margaret Rutheford to me.

    Like

  34. Cary Moore says:

    Looks like Dame Edith Evans.

    Like

  35. Cary Moore says:

    …or rather, Margaret Rutherford.

    Like

  36. Mary Mallory says:

    CHIMES AT MIDNIGHT.

    Like

  37. Patrick says:

    Margaret Rutherford in Chimes at Midnight.

    Like

  38. Candy Cassell says:

    I keep seeing the great Margaret Rutherford in that face, but since she would be too well known for a Monday, perhaps her twin?

    Like

  39. Mary Mallory says:

    Norman Rodway today.

    Like

  40. Charles Kjelland says:

    Margaret Rutherford on Monday!

    Like

  41. Anne Papineau says:

    Norman Rodway?

    Like

  42. Sue Slutzky says:

    Today’s mystery man is Norman Rodway. The movie is “Chimes at Midnight.”

    Like

  43. mandymarie20 says:

    Film has to be ‘Crimes at Midnight”

    Like

  44. mandymarie20 says:

    Guessing on Tuesday, Norman Rodway

    Like

  45. Dan Nather says:

    Looks like I’m late to the party again. I think that’s Margaret Rutherford on Monday.

    Like

    • Dan Nather says:

      And just for the heck of it, I’ll guess the film is CHIMES AT MIDNIGHT, which I haven’t seen in decades (but have ordered the DVD).

      Like

  46. Mike Hawks says:

    I just saw this posting. FALSTAFF/CHIMES AT MIDNIGHT with Margaret Rutherford.

    Like

  47. tucsonbarbara says:

    Norman Rodway

    Like

  48. Chrisbo says:

    I haven’t seen it, but I’ll guess Chimes at Midnight.

    Like

  49. Howard Mandelbaum says:

    Keith Baxter.

    Like

  50. Dewey webb says:

    Margaret Rutherford

    Like

  51. Dewey webb says:

    Chimes at midnight

    Like

  52. You really pulled a fast one there. I thought surely there is nobody who looks like Margaret Rutherford then I thought ‘ It’s Monday, there must be’. So belatedly – Margaret Rutherford is Monday’s pin up.

    Like

  53. Mary Mallory says:

    Keith Baxter.

    Like

  54. B.J.Merholz says:

    Don’t tell me Chimes at Midnight!. I see Orson borrowed from Eisenstein.

    Like

  55. Mike Hawks says:

    Keith Baxter.

    Like

  56. Rogét-L.A. says:

    Wednesday: Keith Baxter. Movie: Chimes at Midnight (1965)

    Like

  57. Anne Papineau says:

    Keith Baxter Wednesday.

    Like

  58. tucsonbarbara says:

    Keith Baxter

    Like

  59. Switched! Tuesday: Tony Beckley; Wednesday: Keith Baxter.

    Like

  60. E. Yarber says:

    Chimes at Midnight! Margaret Rutherford, Norman Rodway and Keith Baxter.!

    This is the movie that explains best why Welles got so grumpy whenever people only wanted to talk about Kane. It only recently got a re-release with decent sound, so perhaps we’re all finally ready for this John and Hal over a half-century later.

    When people talk about Shakespearean film, it’s rare to find a specimen that manages to balance the Bard with a movie that works on its own terms. What you typically find (at least in the submissions I saw) is a wannabe hoping the original work would support whatever he or she was drawing in crayon over the surface. Welles played free with the Bard’s text on both stage and screen, but always with a sharp eye in the service of the specific production at hand. Like Glenn Gould’s recordings of Bach, you wind up with something not quite fish nor fowl, but engaging and rewarding in its own right.

    Like

  61. Patrick says:

    Norman Rodway on Tuesday and Keith Baxter on Wednesday.

    Like

  62. LC says:

    …and the movie is Chimes at Midnight, today is Keith Baxter, coming soon Orson Welles, Jeanne Moreau & John Gielgud.

    Like

  63. Howard Decker says:

    Castle In the Air, 1952, old chap?

    Like

  64. tucsonbarbara says:

    Marina Vlady and Norman Rodway

    Like

  65. Mary Mallory says:

    Marina Vlady and ye olde Orson Welles.

    Like

  66. Anne Papineau says:

    Marina Vlady Thursday. All hail IMDB, btw.

    Like

  67. Mike Hawks says:

    Marina Vlady.

    Like

  68. E. Yarber says:

    Bringing in Marina Vlady as Mrs. Hotspur is an interesting choice. She’s barely in the film, but Welles felt it necessary to include her in such a severely abridged text.

    In the Vlady scenes, Welles presents Hotspur as the socially-acceptable Henry. He’s happily married and is leading a loyal army toward what they all see as a just goal. The seemingly unstable Hal, bouncing between the twin poles of his disapproving father’s and the opportunistic Falstaff’s whorehouse, seems like an easy target for such an amiable winner. However, the battlefield sets everyone on an equal plane. Both covered from head to foot in armor, Hotspur doesn’t even realize he’s dueling with the prince until at the very moment he thinks he has the fight won, Hal dispatches him with an unexpected thrust of the sword. Middle-of-the-road Hotspur has been fatally narrowed by his advantages, while Hal has learned to adjust to the demands of any given moment through his acceptance of irreconcilable realities.

    Thus the film as a whole finds Welles commenting through vivid action on his own paternal issues, as well as a lifetime of public attacks on the “excesses” he was constantly accused of (among other things).

    Most bad adaptations take place because the writer comes to an established work with a preexisting grudge that they impose on the material whether it belongs there or not. Welles, on the other hand, carefully chose the subjects he adapted and was aware enough to find those aspects within them that legitimately supported his personal feelings. Rather than overlay himself on the work, he wore the plays like a glove, subtly directing their course from within.

    I’m reminded of William Gaddis’s 1955 novel The Recognitions, which extends the notion of “I’d wish I’d written that,” to characters who find sincere artistic voices through forgery, plagiarism and counterfeiting. I don’t know if Welles ever read the book and saw something of himself in the image of a creator speaking through earlier works, but he had enough identification with the concept to explore the connection between art and forgery in his final completed work, F is for Fake.

    Like

  69. Chrisbo says:

    Tuesday through Thursgay: Michael Aldridge, Walter Chiari and Jeanne Moreau? Tomorrow: Boy Genius?

    Like

  70. Patrick says:

    Jeanne Moreau and the aforementioned Norman Rodway on Thursday.

    Like

  71. Sue Slutzky says:

    Wednesday’s mystery gent is Walter Chiari. Thursday’s wench is Jeanne Moreau.

    Like

  72. tucsonbarbara says:

    Orson Welles, Keith Baxter and Sir John Gielgud

    Like

  73. Mary Mallory says:

    Orson Welles and John Gielgud today with Keith Baxter again.

    Like

  74. Don Danard says:

    A sleeping Sir John Gielgud.

    Like

  75. Mike Hawks says:

    Orson Welles and in repose John Gielgud.

    Like

  76. beachgal says:

    Monday is Margaret Rutherford. Wed is Keith Baxter. Friday is John Gielgud and Orson Welles

    Like

  77. Orson Welles & John Gielgud.

    Like

  78. Anne Papineau says:

    On Friday the gentleman who purportedly consumed 13 hot dogs at one sitting, a house record at Pink’s on North La Brea; and a knighted gentleman who also played dead most effectively in “The Loved One.”

    Like

  79. Patricia van Hartesveldt says:

    Margaret Rutherford on Monday, Orson Welles and John Gielgud on Friday. Chimes at Midnight?

    Like

  80. E. Yarber says:

    Fittingly, we end with Baxter between Welles and John Gielgud as his two fathers, their respective “crowns” in evidence.

    As Welles presents it, the rivalry between the two older men is largely between opposing frames of reference. While the King and Hotspur would find Falstaff’s parodies of royal practices to be morally objectionable, if not outright blasphemous, both of them suffer for taking the monarchy too seriously. Henry Sr. defeated a weak king without knowing how to proceed afterward, and was entombed in his position. Hotspur would likewise probably have ended up underestimating the weight of royal authority just as he did Hal.

    Hal, thanks to Falstaff’s irreverence, evades the aristocratic echo chamber in favor of the very people ignored by the upper classes. Cutting through the self-serving outlook of the castle establishment, he manages to deconstruct his future role through the sham battles and debates that those around him consider simply games. By the time he has to assume the throne, these practice sessions have allowed him to weed out the weaknesses in his approach in order to immediately settle into active leadership.

    Given that a fair chunk of Shakespeare’s original audience were young bloods who would never leave home without a sword at their side (and Bill himself was known to brawl in the street), this is a nice way of validating the monarchy’s superiority while allowing the crowd to identify with them. If Richard III eventually upset the apple cart for his clan, that only made the incumbent Tudors look even better. From his own perspective, Welles was more inclined to demonstrate the validity of art as a means of setting one on the right path in real life, provided you know how to use it to illuminate truth rather than prop up tired cliches.

    And as this week’s quiz sinks in the sunset and my little craft returns to utter cluelessness, let’s take a moment to lift a glass to poor Sir John Fastolf, a highly skilled commander who suffered a major setback when his superstitious troops fled before Joan of Arc’s forces outside the French town of Patay. Imagine spending your life knee-deep in gore for your King, only to learn in some spiteful afterlife that you’ll either be fictionally immortalized as a drunken fraud or have your entire military career reduced to a single defeat against a teenage girl.

    Like

  81. mandymarie20 says:

    Pictures with Orson Welles in a pot hat are the films best stills

    Like

  82. E. Yarber says:

    I stand corrected. The Welles film about forgery is “F for Fake,” not “F is for Fake.”

    Like

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