Category Archives: Immigration

June 3, 1947: Soldiers Fight Army’s Ban on Japanese Brides

 Note: This is an encore post from 2005 that originally appeared on the 1947project. It was a tough problem for the armed services. In March, an Air Forces lieutenant at Tachikawa Air Base and “a beautiful Japanese girl” killed themselves … Continue reading

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April 27, 1907: Man Badly Injured in Attack by Mule

Note: This is an encore post from 2006. W.S. Stanton of N. 117½ E. First St. was attacked by a vicious mule at the California Truck Company’s stables, No. 337 Aliso St., last night and seriously injured. When he attempted … Continue reading

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In Which a Ghostly Visitor Returns

Note: This post and the next were the finales of my crawl through 1907. Keep on reading because we will circle around with posts from 2006. March 15, 2007 Los Angeles “Well, dear boy, I suppose you thought you were … Continue reading

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March 5, 1907: Monrovia Woman Defies Family, Marries Chinese Man and Moves to Hong Kong

Note: This is an encore post from 2007. March 5, 1907 Los Angeles What shall we do with Emma? She’s gone off to New Mexico and married a Chinaman. Her horrified mother hopes to get the marriage annulled, but Emma … Continue reading

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Jan. 26, 1907: Chinese Man Held in Immigration Case Says He Was Born in the U.S.

Note: This is an encore post from 2007. Jan. 26, 1907 Los Angeles Chin Man Can (or Kan) is in jail on charges of being an illegal immigrant. The young man says he is nothing of the sort, but unable … Continue reading

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Jan. 25, 1947: Shadows in Photograph Clear Man Convicted of Molesting Girl

Note: This is a post I wrote in 2006 for the 1947project. He said he didn’t do it. He said he didn’t lure the little girl into his garage on her way home from school. But he was convicted of … Continue reading

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Who Was California’s First Woman Judge? A Puzzlement

April 17, 1913: Clara Jess, described as the first woman in California to be appointed as a judge, resigns after a year. She was the recorder of Daly City and functioned like a justice of the peace, according to an … Continue reading

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Bill Would Bar Japanese From Owning Land

April 10, 1913: The Times seems to be featuring a woman artist, but it’s difficult to make out her elaborate signature. Is it N. Tanaga? V. Tanaga? V. Kanaga? Aha! she was Neva Kanaga. Further research indicates she was Neva … Continue reading

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Human Fly Flees Hall of Justice

April 4, 1943: Col. Darryl F. Zanuck comes under criticism for trying to return to civilian life. (Zanuck said there wasn’t much chance that he would make more movies of combat.) Sen. Harry Truman (D-Mo.) of the Senate War Program … Continue reading

Posted in 1943, Broadway, Comics, Crime and Courts, Film, Hollywood, Immigration, World War II | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Millennial Moment: Iranian Exiles Find a Bit of Home in Santa Monica Park

Oct. 25, 1982: Times staff writer Bill Overend profiles Iranian exiles who gather in Santa Monica’s Palisades Park on Sunday afternoons, hundreds of people — mostly Jews and some Muslims — who came to the U.S. because of the Iranian … Continue reading

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Mexican Workers Sought to Fill California’s Farm Labor Shortage

June 15, 1942:  The Japanese who operated farms have been evacuated to internment camps, many farm workers have taken defense jobs and still more have been drafted. So to get farm labor, California turns to …  guess where: Mexico! Times … Continue reading

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Pearl Harbor Survivor Kills Himself

Can’t draw? You too can be a famous cartoonist.   Jan. 10, 1942:  Pearl Harbor survivor William Parks kills himself in San Francisco after going AWOL. “His note to his wife indicated that the bombardment he underwent had upset him,” … Continue reading

Posted in 1942, Art & Artists, Columnists, Comics, Film, Hollywood, Immigration, Religion, Tom Treanor | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

L.A. County Pays Immigrants on Welfare to Go Back to Mexico

Dec. 3, 1941: Here’s how Los Angeles County once handled immigration. Officials paid families on welfare $100 ($1,464.25 USD 2010) over 10 months to go back to Mexico. Since 1930-31, more than 4,000 families had gone back to Mexico under … Continue reading

Posted in 1941, Art & Artists, Columnists, Comics, Film, Hollywood, Immigration, Jimmie Fidler, Tom Treanor, World War II, Zoot Suit | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Women Reporters

Nov. 17, 1941: Reporter Mary Shaw Leader is honored posthumously for her work in covering Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address. Leader, a reporter for the Hanover Spectator, walked 15 miles to Gettysburg, Pa., to cover the Lincoln’s talk. “She carried his … Continue reading

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British Library Digitizes Lewis Carroll’s Original ‘Alice’

Image: Page 37 of Lewis Carroll’s “Alice’s Adventures Under Ground,” digitized by the British Library. Henry Chu writes a nondupe in the Los Angeles Times about unsuccessful attempts to gain access to Scotland Yard’s records in the Jack the Ripper … Continue reading

Posted in Art & Artists, Books and Authors, Crime and Courts, Immigration, Libraries, Museums | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

#architecture, #books, #history, #museums, 7|23|2011 [Updated]

Photos: Josef Mengele’s notebooks. Credit: Alexander Autographs. RECOMMENDED Randy Kennedy of the New York Times catches up with famous/notorious graffiti artist/tagger TAKI 183 at a book signing for “The History of American Graffiti.” Rex Huppke’s ‘I Just Work Here’ Column … Continue reading

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Coming Attractions: Genealogy Research at the L.A. Public Library

The Los Angeles Public Library will present a program on getting started in genealogical research. The free presentation will be from 11 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on Saturday, July 16, 2011. Folks should gather at the reference desk in the … Continue reading

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Immigrants Overwhelm San Diego!

San Diego has everything a family might want: A moderate climate and jobs in the expanding defense industries. But there’s no place to live.  Rep. John H. Tolan (D-Oakland) is holding hearings in San Diego on the plight of migrants … Continue reading

Posted in 1941, 1947, Black Dahlia, Books and Authors, Cold Cases, Crime and Courts, Environment, Film, Hollywood, Homicide, Immigration, LAPD, San Diego, Transportation, World War II | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

In Which a Ghostly Visitor Returns

March 15, 2007Los Angeles “Well, dear boy, I suppose you thought you were through.” “Yes, I did.” “And?” “Good grief! Do you see this bridge over the Gold Line? It looks like it’s held up with hairpins and spit!” “Saliva, … Continue reading

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An Independent Woman

March 5, 1907Los Angeles What shall we do with Emma? She’s gone off to New Mexico and married a Chinaman. Her horrified mother hopes to get the marriage annulled, but Emma is an independent-minded young lady. Emma’s mother, Mary Culver … Continue reading

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