Movieland Mystery Photo (Updated)

Feb. 18, 2019, Mystery Photo

For Monday, we have a mystery chap with impressive lapels. (I failed to note that his companion was cropped out of the picture. We’ll see him later).

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Posted in Film, Hollywood, Mystery Photo | Tagged , , | 5 Comments

Black Dahlia: 6 Reasons Dr. George Hodel Didn’t Kill Elizabeth Short — No. 6 No Connection

Elizabeth Short contrasted with the unidentified woman found in George Hodel’s photo album. Not at all the same.


Here are six reasons Dr. George Hodel did not kill Elizabeth Short that you will need to know before watching the TNT mini-series “I Am the Night” or listening to the eight-part podcast accompanying the production.

Reason No. 6: Dr. George Hodel had no connection to Elizabeth Short.

Previously:

Reason No 1: George Hodel was never “a prime suspect” in the Black Dahlia case.

Reason No. 2: George Hodel was found not guilty of morals charges.

Reason No. 3: George Hodel was not pals with Man Ray.

Reason No. 4: George Hodel served the poor blacks of Bronzeville.

Reason No. 5: George Hodel had no surgical practice in Los Angeles.

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Posted in 1947, Black Dahlia, Books and Authors, Cold Cases, Crime and Courts, Homicide, LAPD, Television | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Black Dahlia: Caught in the Act – Steve Hodel Adds Lies to George Hodel’s Wikipedia Page

wikipedia_george_hodel_2019_0218

So I just caught Steve Hodel inserting a nice, fat lie in his dad’s Wikipedia page. Oh this is so much fun!

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Posted in 1947, Black Dahlia, Books and Authors, Television, Wikipedia | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mary Mallory / Hollywood Heights — AMPAS Awards Stills Photographers

AMPAS STILLS SHOW SONG OF B

“A close second as the Best Production Still Out-of-Doors, is this beautifully composed and lighted scene from “Song of Bernadette,” 20th-Century-Fox production, by Stax Graves,” Courtesy of Mary Mallory.


Note: This is an encore of a post from 2014.

O
ver its 87-year-old history, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has recognized outstanding work by individuals involved in the filmmaking process. Above-the line-talent like actors and directors have been recognized, along with behind-the-scenes contributors like editors, composers, and production and costume designers. Science and technology experts are also receive awards for their contributions in improving equipment and technology for the filmmaking process.

For four years during the 1940s, AMPAS also presented awards to motion picture studio stills photographers, recognizing their work in producing creative and beautiful visual representations selling motion pictures to consumers. Although the winning stillsmen did not receive Oscar statuettes or gain wide publicity for their awards, this competition was the very first important public acknowledgment of the importance still photographers played in promoting films to the movie-going public.

Mary Mallory’s “Hollywoodland: Tales Lost and Found” is available for the Kindle.

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Posted in Film, Hollywood, Hollywood Heights, Mary Mallory, Photography | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Jan. 5, 1959: LAPD Suspends Officer for – Uh-Oh

Jan. 5, 1959, LAPD suspends officer

Jan. 5, 1959: Chief William Parker suspends Officer Charles Wolf serial No. 4115 for 15 days for … oh dear. Banging “a known prostitute and dissolute person” and letting her get possession of his firearm.

This material is from the city archives and was published on latimes.com in 2009 from research by then-UCLA intern Catriona Lavery. The original post is available via Archive.org.

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Posted in 1959, City Hall, Crime and Courts, LAPD, Libraries | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Feb. 14, 1959: Matt Weinstock (Almost) All Bets Are Off at Raided Bookie Joint

Matt Weinstock, L.A. Mirror, 1959

Feb. 14, 1959: Matt Weinstock ends his week with an assortment of amusing stories, a poem and a bit of literature. Weinstock had an impressive number and variety of people feeding items to him. He made it look easy.

Weinstock’s column originally ran in the L.A. Mirror in 1959 and was republished on latimes.com in 2009. The entire column is available via Archive.org.

Posted in 1959, Books and Authors, Columnists, Matt Weinstock | Tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Feb. 14, 1959: Paul Coates Gets Some Reader Feedback

Feb. 14, 1959, Paul Coates

Feb. 14, 1959: It’s Saturday in 1959, and Paul Coates ends the week with some letters, a typical ploy in the days when columnists published six times a week, a punishing schedule. And there is a Parkey Sharkey alert! Also Mickey Cohen.

Coates’ column appeared in the L.A. Mirror in 1959 and was republished in 2009 on latimes.com. The entire column is available via Archive.org.

Posted in 1959, Columnists, Mickey Cohen, Paul Coates, Television | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

Feb. 14, 1882: Valentine’s Day Love and Jokes

Feb. 14, 1882, Valentine's Day

Feb. 14, 1882: Love and practical jokes flourish by the wagon load in Los Angeles. “More hearts are made sad by the villainous characters and miserable doggerel sent out broadcast, than can be cured before the next valentine day comes around. The American people are a nation of jokers and never lose a chance to play a practical joke and this chance cannot be lost, however much pain may be given.

This item appeared in the L.A. Times in 1882 and was republished in 2009 on latimes.com. It is available via Archive.org.

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Feb. 13, 1959: Matt Weinstock and Valentine’s Day

Matt Weinstock, Feb. 13, 1959

Feb. 13, 1959: Matt Weinstock ends the day with a few thoughts about Valentine’s Day. Plus the usual assortment of short poems and amusing stories.

The Mirror’s copy desk must have had some wags. I was about to say that they must have had more down time in the days of hot metal and typewriters,  but of course with multiple editions, they kept pretty busy.

Weinstock’s column ran in 1959 in the L.A. Mirror and was republished on latimes.com in 2009. It is available via Archive.org.

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Feb. 13, 1959: Paul Coates — Behind Bars in a Mexican Jail

Paul Coates, Feb. 13, 1959, L.A. Mirror

Feb. 13, 1959: Paul Coates takes another look at Americans held in jail in Tijuana. Those who were arrested in a raid on a Rosarito Beach casino were the elite. A man who was being held for running a red light was not so fortunate.

This column originally appeared in the L.A. Mirror in 1959 and was republished on latimes.com in 2009. It is available via Archive.org.

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Feb. 12, 1959: Matt Weinstock and ‘The Last Days of Lincoln’

matt_weinstock It’s a worthwhile experience to put down whatever you’re doing for half an hour today and read something about one of the world’s great men. It doesn’t matter which of the books about him you read. His wisdom and humor and particularly his compassion come through in all of them, even in the vignettes in Reader’s Digest.

I’ve been reading Mark Van Doren’s recently published play, “The Last Days of Lincoln,” which covers the last few weeks before his death.

The end of the war was imminent and the big issue was whether the terms of surrender should be harsh or generous. Some hotheads were for hanging the generals and destroying the South. Lincoln patiently tried to convey to them his feeling that such rash action would only add to the tragedy of a divided, stricken nation.

Feb. 12, 1959: Matt Weinstock closes the day with his usual light touch. And yes, the Civil War.

This column appeared in the L.A. Mirror in 1959 and was republished on latimes.com in 2009. It is available via Archive.org.

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Feb. 12, 1959: Paul Coates – When VD Was ‘Cured’

Paul Coates, Feb. 12, 1959, L.A. Mirror

Feb. 12, 1959: After World War II, many Americans assumed that penicillin had eliminated venereal disease (STDs to you youngsters). And, no, it was still around.

This column originally appeared in the L.A. Mirror in 1959 and was republished on latimes.com in 2009. It’s available via Archive.org.

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‘Dear Los Angeles’: 1,000 Quotes in Search of a Book

Dear Los Angeles
We have Edwin Mims, long-forgotten teacher, author and head of the English Department at Vanderbilt University, to thank for what may be the most famous quip about Los Angeles.

Mims, who died in 1959 at the age of 87, was a frequent summer lecturer at USC and about the summer of 1938, he apparently gave birth to one of the most frequently repeated lines about Los Angeles, calling it “12 suburbs in search of a city.”

I mention Mims and his bon mot because of David Kipen’s book “Dear Los Angeles,” an anthology of observations in diaries and letters about the city from 1542 to 2018.

If I have learned anything in studying Los Angeles for several decades, it’s to control my expectations about books on L.A. From the earliest reviews, “Dear Los Angeles” never seemed like a book I would ever buy, but it also seemed like a book I should at least examine. “Dear Los Angeles” was so popular among patrons of the Los Angeles Public Library that I waited a fair amount of time in the queue before a copy arrived a my local branch.

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Posted in 2018, Books and Authors, History | Tagged , , , | 4 Comments

Mary Mallory / Hollywood Heights — Rah! Rah! Hollywood Celebrates Pennants

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Note: This is an encore post from 2013.

Hollywood has always been creative in promoting its films and personalities to the public. Employing posters, lobby cards, window cards and photographs, silent film production companies hyped upcoming films. With the success of these forms of advertisements and publicity, companies began selling or giving away photographs, buttons, pillow tops, plates and pennants featuring likenesses of popular moving picture stars as souvenirs and collectibles to eager fans.

The film industry was usually not the first to conceive of ideas; instead, it built on successful practices and gimmicks of other fields. One such popular practice the silent film industry quickly copied was the manufacture and distribution of small felt pennants promoting either producing companies or the film stars of such organizations.

Now on Amazon: “Hollywoodland: Tales Lost and Found” by Mary Mallory

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Movieland Mystery Photo (Updated + + + +)

Eyes in the Night
This week’s mystery movie was the 1942 MGM film “Eyes in the Night,” with Edward Arnold, Ann Harding, Donna Reed, Horace McNally, Katherine Emery, Allen Jenkins, Stanley C. Ridges, Reginald Denny,  John Emery, Rosemary de Camp, Erik Rolf, Barry Nelson, Reginald Sheffield, Steve Geray, Mantan Moreland and Friday.

Produced by Jack Chertok, screenplay by Guy Trosper and Howard Emmett Rogers, from a book by Baynard Kendrick. Photography by Robert Planck and Charles Lawton, music by Lennie Hayton, recording by Douglas Shearer, art direction by Cedric Gibbons and Stan Rogers, set decorations by Edwin B. Willis and Edward J. Boyle, gowns by Kalloch, editing by Ralph Winters. Directed by Fred Zinnemann. “Eyes in the Night” was Anne Harding’s first picture since 1937 (“Love From a Stranger”).

“Eyes in the Night” is available on DVD from TCM.

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Posted in 1942, Animals, Film, Hollywood, Mystery Photo | Tagged , , , , , | 73 Comments

Ed Fuentes: We Lose a Member of the Brain Trust

Ed Fuentes

Dear friends and members of the Brain Trust. We lost a charter member with the death of Ed Fuentes, who apparently suffered a fatal heart attack, according to Facebook.

Ed was the subject of my first column at The Times and I was so pleased to let latimes.com readers know about him. A huge loss.

(You see some of Ed’s work whenever you read the Daily Mirror because he designed the nameplate. It took him all of 20 minutes. He asked me later if I wanted to freshen it and I said no, it was perfect just as he had done it. And bless him, he did it out of friendship.)

In every sense, Fuentes is larger than life. He’s not exactly tall and not exactly slender, often a bit rumpled, with a few days of stubble and a full head of hair like coarse steel wool. He’s always equipped with at least one camera and a broad sense of humor. In fact, when he said we could meet at the Pie Hole, a restaurant on Traction Avenue, I thought he was joking.

It is his passion for downtown L.A. that has set him apart, chronicling its renaissance and emerging arts community over the last half a dozen years in a series of blogs that give a sense of the area’s history as much as its beauty, including his own View From a Loft and, most recently, Departures for KCET.

He may be little-known to large segments of the city he loves, but in downtown, his voice has endured.

Here’s the link.

Posted in 2012, 2019, Art & Artists, Brain Trust, Obituaries | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

Feb. 6, 1959: Matt Weinstock – Looking for the Real ‘77 Sunset Strip’

Feb. 6, 1959, Matt Weinstock

Feb. 6, 1959: The wildly popular Warner Bros. TV show “77 Sunset Strip” has people visiting the location at 8532 Sunset Blvd., next to Dino’s, and writing letters. Lots of letters. Kookie, man.

Weinstock’s column was originally published in the L.A. Mirror in 1959 and republished on latimes.com in 2009. It is available at Archive.org, daddy-o.

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Feb. 6, 1959: Paul Coates — Butch Harris Joins Cub Scouts at Last

image


Feb. 6, 1959:
Paul Coates writes a happy ending to the Lewis “Butch” Harris saga. This comes after the Sentinel reported a different outcome.

Coates’ column originally appeared in the L.A. Mirror in 1959 and was republished on latimes.com in 2009. It is available via Archive.org.

And Butch/Lewis, if you’re reading this, Drop us a line

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Feb. 3, 1939: Nuestro Pueblo

image

Feb. 3, 1939: Nuestro Pueblo, by Joe Seewerker with illustrations by Charles Owens, was one of my favorite discoveries in The Times. The columns were collected and published in a book that is also one of my favorites. It’s a bit hard to find but worth the search..

This column originally appeared in the L.A. Times in 1939 and was republished on latimes.com in 2009. It is available via Archive.org.

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March 1902: A ‘Cure’ for Anorexia

L.A. Times, 1902

March 5 1902: Apparently lying with a cinder block on the stomach is a “cure” for the “emaciated” woman.

“The bony woman is, ninety-nine times out of a hundred, the typical creature we know at a glance and summarize as ‘all nerves.’ ”

This story originally appeared in 1902 and was reposted in 2009 on latimes.com. It is available via Archive.org.

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Black Dahlia: George Hodel and Rachmaninoff – A Meeting That Never Occurred

most_evil_page_10_george_hodel_pianist

So here we have a passing mention of piano prodigy George Hodel, age 9, meeting Sergei Rachmaninoff “accompanied by the Russian minister of culture.”

I’m particularly interested in this line because Rachmaninoff (Kristof Konrad) shows up in “I Am the Night” while Man Ray (Exhibit B in the George “Evil Genius” Hodel franchise) doesn’t appear. Possibly the Man Ray Trust frowned on the depiction of him as a maniacal killer.

Previously on George Hodel, piano prodigy.

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Posted in 1917, 1919, 1947, Another Good Story Ruined, Black Dahlia, Books and Authors, Music | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment