Movieland Mystery Photo (Updated + + +)

March 18, 2019, Mystery Photo

For Monday, we have a mystery child. He approves of our leading leady, whom you will see on Friday.

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Black Dahlia: 6 Reasons Dr. George Hodel Didn’t Kill Elizabeth Short — No. 6 No Connection

Elizabeth Short contrasted with the unidentified woman found in George Hodel’s photo album. Not at all the same.


Here are six reasons Dr. George Hodel did not kill Elizabeth Short that you will need to know before watching the TNT mini-series “I Am the Night” or listening to the eight-part podcast accompanying the production.

Reason No. 6: Dr. George Hodel had no connection to Elizabeth Short.

Previously:

Reason No 1: George Hodel was never “a prime suspect” in the Black Dahlia case.

Reason No. 2: George Hodel was found not guilty of morals charges.

Reason No. 3: George Hodel was not pals with Man Ray.

Reason No. 4: George Hodel served the poor blacks of Bronzeville.

Reason No. 5: George Hodel had no surgical practice in Los Angeles.

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Posted in 1947, Black Dahlia, Books and Authors, Cold Cases, Crime and Courts, Homicide, LAPD, Television | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Gentlemen, Your Wedding Photos Are Ready After 62 Years, Part 6

1957 Gay Wedding, Philadelphia

If you just tuned in, I’m digging into the 1957 photos of a wedding of two men in Philadelphia. The film was left at a photo shop and the manager refused to return the pictures, which were saved by a store employee and later sold on EBay. Copies of the images were given to the ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives, which is trying to identify the men in the photos.

Previously:

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5

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Gentlemen, Your Wedding Photos Are Ready After 62 Years, Part 5

1957 gay wedding

This is the last interior shot accompanying the photos of the 1957 wedding of two men in Philadelphia. Let’s see if we can detect anything that may shed some light on our mystery guests.

Previously:

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4

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Posted in 1957, Architecture, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Philadelphia, Photography | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Mary Mallory / Hollywood Heights — “ ‘Nice People’ Wear Mallory Hats”

Mallory Hats Window
Mallory hats, courtesy of Mary Mallory.


Note: This is an encore post from 2014.

N
ot many companies in the United States can claim over 100 years in business, especially clothing manufacturers, who must deal with so many unique variables, and in particular, constantly changing styles. Two purveyors of classic, quality clothing, Brooks Brothers and Levi’s, have been operating more than 100 years. One, Mallory Hats, constructed quality, classic men’s and women’s hats for more than 142 years before ending production in 1965. Here is their story.

The brochure/book, “A Century of Hats and the Hats of the Century,” published in 1923, relays the history of the industry surrounding the manufacturing of hats by the Mallory family in Danbury, Conn. The text claims the first hat manufactured in the United States came out of Danbury in 1684. Ezra Mallory established his own hat manufacturing concern in 1823 to construct beaver “stovepipe” hats. Mallory supervised the making of hats, and ventured to neighboring towns and stores to sell his wares, and by 1825, took steamboats to New York promoting his stock. His company slowly grew in number and reputation, adding new styles to their output. They produced roughly twelve hats a week.

Mary Mallory’s “Hollywood: Tales Lost and Found” is available for the Kindle.

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Gentlemen, Your Wedding Photos Are Ready After 62 Years, Part 4

1957 Philadelphia Gay Wedding

Here is another interior shot from the film showing the wedding of two men in 1957. This image, alas, doesn’t seem to have as much information. Let’s take a closer look.

Previously:

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

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Posted in 1957, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Philadelphia, Photography | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Black Dahlia: Did George Hodel Kill His Secretary? Another Steve Hodel Lie

1945 Ruth Spaulding Suicide

Steve Hodel claims repeatedly in his “Black Dahlia Avenger” franchise that his father,
George Hodel, killed his secretary, Ruth Spaulding. It’s even in Wikipedia.

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Posted in 1945, 1947, Black Dahlia, Cold Cases, LAPD, Suicide | Tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Gentlemen, Your Wedding Photos Are Ready After 62 Years, Part 3

1957 Gay Wedding Interior

In case you just tuned in, I’m exploring a series of photos taken in 1957 of a wedding between two men. The photo shop refused to return the photos, which were saved by a store employee and sold on EBay many years later. The ONE Archives also received copies of the images and is trying to identify the men in the pictures. Before looking at the gents and the ceremony, I thought it would be helpful to examine the decor of the home where the event took place.

Previously:

Part 1 | Part 2

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Posted in 1957, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Philadelphia, Photography | Tagged , , , , , | 7 Comments

Gentlemen, Your Wedding Photos Are Ready After 62 Years, Part 2

1957 same-sex wedding Philadelphia
Yesterday, I posted a few photos from 1957 showing a wedding between two unidentified men.

Before we get to the event, let’s look at some of the decor to see if we can find any clues. Whoever snapped these pictures filled out the roll with some shots of a home.

Previously on the L.A. Daily Mirror:

Gentlemen, Your Wedding Photos Are Ready After 62 Years.

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Posted in 1957, Art & Artists, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Philadelphia | Tagged , , , , , | 5 Comments

Mary Mallory / Hollywood Heights: Clarence Brown Provides Quick Shave to King Gillette Ranch

King Gillette, New York Times, 1932
King Camp Gillette dies at the age of 77 in 1932. He gave architect Wallace Neff free rein to built an expansive ranch in Calabasas, but only lived there for a few years before his death.


Tennessean Clarence Brown reigned as one of MGM’s top directors in the early 1930s, directing everything from Greta Garbo star vehicles to Joan Crawford Pre-Codes to Clark Gable romantic comedies. Looking for a ranch at which he could spread his wings, literally and figuratively, Brown purchased the lush King Gillette Ranch out in Calabasas, fit for any pasha. Brown enjoyed his little slice of paradise, helping preserve its unique character.

A bucolic wonderland in the 1920s, far from the city, Calabasas and the surrounding area of the Santa Monica Mountains lured the elite westward for rural rest and relaxation. Razor king King C. Gillette fell under the area’s spell in 1928, purchasing 640 acres on which to erect a grand hacienda by the popular architect Wallace Neff.

Mary Mallory’s latest book, Living With Grace: Life Lessons From America’s Princess,”  is now on sale.

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Posted in 1928, 1932, Architecture, Hollywood, Hollywood Heights, Mary Mallory | Tagged , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Movieland Mystery Photo (Updated + + + +)

March16, 2019, Mystery Photo
This week’s mystery movie was the 1951 Ealing Studios film “The Man in the White Suit,” with Alec Guinness, Joan Greenwood, Cecil Parker, Michael Gough, Ernest Thesiger, Vida Hope, Howard Marion Crawford, Miles Malleson, Henry Mollison, Patric Doonan and Duncan Lamont.

Based on the play by Roger MacDougall, screenplay by Roger MacDougall, John Dighton and Alexander Mackendrick,  production supervisor Hal Mason, photography by Douglas Slocombe, edited by Bernard Gribble, unit production manager L.C. Rudkin, sound supervisor Stephen Dalby, camera operator Jeff Seaholme, assistant director David Peers, recordist Arthur Bradburn, continuity Felicia Manheim, costume designer Anthony Mendeleson, special processes Geoffrey Dickinson, special effects by Sydney Pearson, makeup by Ernest Taylor and Harry Frampton, hairstyles by Barbara Banard, scientific adviser Geoffrey Myers, additional photography by Lionel Banes, art director Jim Morahan, associate producer Sidney Cole, music by Benjamin Frankel, played by the Philharmonia Orchestra, conducted by Ernest Irving. Produced by Michael Balcon, directed by Alexander Mackendrick.

“The Man in the White Suit” is available on DVD from Amazon.

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Posted in 1951, Film, Hollywood, Mystery Photo | Tagged , , , , | 34 Comments

Gentlemen, Your Wedding Photos Are Ready After 62 Years

1957 Gay Wedding

Can you identify any of these men?

In 1957, film with these images was left to be developed at a photo shop at Broad Street and Allegheny Avenue in North Philadelphia. According to Philadelphia Gay News, the shop manager had a policy of not returning photos to customers if he found the content objectionable, as he apparently did with these pictures of a gay wedding.

Rather than destroying the photos, however, he allowed store employees to have the unreturned  pictures and these images were saved by a woman who worked in the shop. The woman’s daughter, Jackie Madarang, found the pictures many years later and sold them on EBay, but donated copies to the ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives.

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Posted in 1957, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Philadelphia, Photography | Tagged , , , , | 6 Comments

Movieland Mystery Photo (Updated + + + +)

Hell's Hinges

This week’s mystery movie was the 1916 New York Motion Picture Co./Triangle Film Corp. production “Hell’s Hinges,” with W.S. Hart, Clara Williams, Jack Standing, Alfred Hollingsworth, Robert McKim, J. Frank Burke and Louise Glaum.

It can be streamed for free at the National Film Preservation Foundation website. (The preserved version lacks an opening title card).

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Posted in 1916, Film, Hollywood, Mystery Photo | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 20 Comments

Mary Mallory: Hollywood Heights – Mary Pickford Day

Dec. 4, 1923, Mary Pickford Day

Note: This is an encore post from 2013.

Los Angeles in 1923 was a bustling, growing, optimistic place.  The town recognized all sorts of interesting people and topics, saluting them with their own days.  There were Raisin Day, Prune Day, Father-and-Son Day, Fireless Cooker Day, and many others that year.  Dec. 3, 1923 was Mary Pickford Day, which unfortunately coincided with Golden Rule Day.  Per the Dec. 4, 1923,  Los Angeles Times, only a few Golden Rule observations occurred.

“Hollywood Celebrates the Holidays” by Karie Bible and Mary Mallory is available at Amazon and at local bookstores.

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Mary Mallory / Hollywood Heights: Noble Johnson Emancipates African Americans With Lincoln Film Co.

Noble Johnson

Recognized for playing Native Americans, Pacific Islanders and Latinos in “King Kong,” “The Mummy,” “The Ten Commandments” and many others throughout his long film career, African American Noble Johnson achieved greater renown for establishing Lincoln Motion Picture Company in 1916, the first company making and releasing films strictly for African American audiences. Almost forgotten today, Johnson strove to make what were called “race” films emphasizing the intelligence, talents and success of black Americans as a counterpoint to the often racist and off-putting portrayals of African Americans in contemporary films.

Born 1881 in Missouri, Johnson moved with his family to Colorado Springs, Colo., where he worked with animals before he began appearing in silent films in 1914, including Cecil B. DeMille’s “The Squaw Man.” His athletic, tall frame and dramatic features helped land him many acting jobs at major studios, and his talent for performing gained him good notices in almost everything he portrayed, even in small roles. Not only did he act, but he also wrote scripts.

Mary Mallory’s latest book, Living With Grace: Life Lessons from America’s Princess,”  is now on sale.

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Movieland Mystery Photo (Updated + + + +)

Lawyer Man title card

This week’s mystery movie was the 1932 Warner Bros. film “Lawyer Man” with William Powell, Joan Blondell, David Landau, Helen Vinson, Claire Dodd, Alan Dinehart and Allen Jenkins. Screenplay by Rian James and James Seymour, based on the novel “Lawyer Man” by Max Trell, edited by Thomas Pratt, art direction by Esdras Hartley, photography by Robert Kurrle, gowns by Orry-Kelly, associate director Stanley Logan, Vitaphone Orchestra directed by Leo F. Forbstein.

Directed by William Dieterle.

“Lawyer Man” is available from Warner Archive in the “Forbidden Hollywood Collection” Volume 4.

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Posted in 1932, Film, Hollywood, Mystery Photo | Tagged , , , , , , , | 34 Comments

Mary Mallory / Hollywood Heights: UCLA Festival of Preservation Features Newly Restored Films

Bobby Troup Stars of Jazz
Continuing its long tradition, UCLA presented its popular Festival of Preservation condensed into a mini film festival over one weekend, unlike those in the past spread out over a month. The selection covered the gamut of entertainment, from film noir to silents to animation to television kinescopes. While I was only able to attend one day, the films I watched looked great and offered moving and hilarious entertainment.

I attended Saturday, February 16, to see restored silent shorts and eclectic TV productions. The day kicked off with a screening of “Playhouse 90,” preceded by a rare, fascinating kinescope of a closed-circuit press conference filled with elaborate production work, cutting back and forth between stars, sets, and the TV stage. Opening with a shot of CBS Television City off Fairfax Avenue, the kinescope featured appearances from a wild blend of behind-the-scenes executives and major stars.

Mary Mallory’s latest book, Living With Grace: Life Lessons from America’s Princess,”  is now on sale.

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Black Dahlia: Caught in the Act – Steve Hodel Adds Lies to George Hodel’s Wikipedia Page

wikipedia_george_hodel_2019_0218

So I just caught Steve Hodel inserting a nice, fat lie in his dad’s Wikipedia page. Oh this is so much fun!

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Posted in 1947, Black Dahlia, Books and Authors, Television, Wikipedia | Tagged , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Movieland Mystery Photo (Updated + + + +)

Feb. 23, 2019, Mystery Photo

This week’s mystery movie was the 1940 20th Century-Fox film “Night Train to Munich,” with Margaret Lockwood, Rex Harrison, Paul von Henried (Henreid), Basil Radford, Maunton Wayne, James Harcourt, Felix Aylmer, Wyndham Goldie, Roland Culver, Eliot Makeham, Raymond Huntley, Austen Trevor, Keneth Kent, C.V. France, Fritz Valk, Morland Graham.

Based on an original story by Gordon Wellesley. Screenplay by Sydney Gillat and Frank Launder. Directed by Carol Reed.  Photography by Otto Kanturek, art direction by Vetchinsky, editing by R.E. Dearing, sound supervision by B.C. Sewell, cutting by Michael Gordon, recording by S. Wiles, musical direction by Louis Levy. Produced by Edward Black.

Made at Gaumont British Studios, Shepherds Bush, London, Maurice Ostrer in charge of production.

“Night Train to Munich” is available on DVD from the Criterion Collection.

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Posted in 1940, Film, Hollywood, Mystery Photo | Tagged , , , , | 37 Comments

Mary Mallory / Hollywood Heights — AMPAS Awards Stills Photographers

AMPAS STILLS SHOW SONG OF B

“A close second as the Best Production Still Out-of-Doors, is this beautifully composed and lighted scene from “Song of Bernadette,” 20th-Century-Fox production, by Stax Graves,” Courtesy of Mary Mallory.


Note: This is an encore of a post from 2014.

O
ver its 87-year-old history, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has recognized outstanding work by individuals involved in the filmmaking process. Above-the line-talent like actors and directors have been recognized, along with behind-the-scenes contributors like editors, composers, and production and costume designers. Science and technology experts are also receive awards for their contributions in improving equipment and technology for the filmmaking process.

For four years during the 1940s, AMPAS also presented awards to motion picture studio stills photographers, recognizing their work in producing creative and beautiful visual representations selling motion pictures to consumers. Although the winning stillsmen did not receive Oscar statuettes or gain wide publicity for their awards, this competition was the very first important public acknowledgment of the importance still photographers played in promoting films to the movie-going public.

Mary Mallory’s “Hollywoodland: Tales Lost and Found” is available for the Kindle.

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Posted in Film, Hollywood, Hollywood Heights, Mary Mallory, Photography | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Jan. 5, 1959: LAPD Suspends Officer for – Uh-Oh

Jan. 5, 1959, LAPD suspends officer

Jan. 5, 1959: Chief William Parker suspends Officer Charles Wolf serial No. 4115 for 15 days for … oh dear. Banging “a known prostitute and dissolute person” and letting her get possession of his firearm.

This material is from the city archives and was published on latimes.com in 2009 from research by then-UCLA intern Catriona Lavery. The original post is available via Archive.org.

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Posted in 1959, City Hall, Crime and Courts, LAPD, Libraries | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment