Harvey Glatman: The Early Years — Part 2

Aug. 26, 1946, Knickerbocker News

Aug. 26, 1946: Harvey Glatman is arraigned on robbery charges in Albany, N.Y.


When he was still a teenager, Harvey Glatman was already displaying the behavior that led to the deaths of three Southern California women in the 1950s and his execution in the gas chamber.

Glatman was born in New York, but moved with his parents, Abe and Ophelia, to Denver, where he apparently lived until his middle teens.

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A photo of 1565 Townsend Ave., the Bronx, via Google Street View, where serial killer Harvey Glatman came to live with relatives in August 1946.


According to an Aug. 26, 1946, story in the Herald Statesman of Yonkers, N.Y., Glatman had been arrested May 18, 1945, in Denver on charges of attempted robbery. The story also noted that Glatman, who was 17 at the time, was “suspected as the man ‘terrorizing’ girls on Capitol Hill in Denver.”

According to a synopsis of the case by Boulder County Sheriff’s Detective Steven G. Ainsworth, in July 1945,  Glatman kidnapped a young girl in Boulder, took her to Sunshine Canyon, tied her up and fondled her during the night. Glatman released her the next morning, Ainsworth says.

The Herald Statesman also reports of Glatman’s offenses in Denver: “Police in that city said the suspect would accost girls at night, disrobe them and tie them to trees. “

Without access to the Denver papers, it’s difficult to determine more about these youthful offenses and it’s possible little was written about them because he was a minor.

But as a result, Glatman was apparently convicted and placed probation. On Aug. 2, 1946, Glatman’s mother took him to New York with the court’s permission to either visit or stay with relatives, a family named Feldman, who lived at 1565 Townsend Ave. in the Bronx and operated a summertime concession in Rockaway.

To be continued.

About lmharnisch

I am retired from the Los Angeles Times
This entry was posted in 1945, 1946, 1957, 1958, 1959, Homicide and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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