June 25, 1908


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rue confession: I mixed up June 26, 1908 and June 25, 1908. I suppose that happens more often that one might suspect–or not. Readers either politely didn’t bring it to my attention or didn’t notice. Thank you for your diplomacy.

To get to the point: The Times notes that the death of Grover Cleveland leaves the United States without a living ex-president. That will change when Theodore Roosevelt is succeeded by William Taft, but I’m trying to think of the next time the U.S. was in a similar situation. Certainly not in my lifetime.

In the second section, eight people are injured in the head-on crash of two streetcars at the Arroyo Seco bridge. Passengers on the outbound streetcar blame the crash on inattention by the motorman, who was "working with his motor" before the streetcar collided with the inbound car from Pasadena. Note that one of the injured was taken home instead of going to a hospital.

Also notice a meeting of Zionists for a fundraiser at the synagogue at Olive and Temple. Those who contribute to the cause can have their names inscribed in an elaborate "book of gold," The Times says. 

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About lmharnisch

I am retired from the Los Angeles Times
This entry was posted in @news, Front Pages, Politics, Religion, Transportation and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to June 25, 1908

  1. David Geiser says:

    To get to the point: The Times notes that the death of Grover Cleveland leaves the United States without a living ex-president. That will change when Theodore Roosevelt is succeeded by William Taft, but I’m trying to think of the next time the U.S. was in a similar situation. Certainly not in my lifetime.
    Actually, from the time of Lyndon Johnson’s death on 22 Jan 1973 until Nixon’s resignation in August the following year, there were no living ex-presidents. Nixon would be the next ex-president to die, some twenty years later.

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