Van Nuys Boulevard

Dec. 29, 1957
Los Angeles

1957_1229_van_nuys

Isn’t this building cool, in its weird 1950s Space Age way? This is a wonderful detail from a Times ad for the opening of a Van Nuys Savings and Loan office at 8201 Van Nuys Blvd. The building is still there, but unfortunately, it doesn’t look anything like this anymore. I’ll try to get out to Panorama City for a shot in the near future. And here’s a shout-out to the Van Nuys Boomers blog. Thanks for reading!

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Update: It’s unclear to me just how much the building has changed since 1957. Before I wrote the post, I found one online image that indicated the building had been fairly compromised by later remodeling. Richard Hultman sent me some satellite images that make it appear to be more intact. A field is definitely in order. Stay tuned!

About lmharnisch

I am retired from the Los Angeles Times
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1 Response to Van Nuys Boulevard

  1. Hi there…
    I live very close to what I’ve dubbed “The Sputnik Buiilding” in beautiful Panorama City. I’m an alternate on the Panorama City Neighborhood Council board.
    The most distant memory of the building I have is it being a Crocker Bank. It was then absorbed by Great Western Savings, then in turn by Washington Mutual. When WaMu bought Home Savings and moved into their branch at Van Nuys and Chase, the Sputnik Building was vacated. It stood vacant for several years, and during that time distinguished itself by being featured in the grade-Z movie “Stealing Harvard.”
    About 5 or 6 years ago, the Sputnik Building was turned into the furniture store The Kings of Credit. Adding to the Roadside Attraction nature of the Sputnik Building is the huge armchair that they use as an attention-getting device. I’ve got pictures.
    There is another really cool Roadside Attraction-type decorated building on the north end of the Panorama Mall: the La Curacao Department Store. It’s topped with a replica of an Aztec pyramid, and has replicas of Aztec and Maya bas-reliefs on the sides.

    Like

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