Wikipedia: Murder and Myth — Part 11

Wikipedia -- Wallace Beery

In case you just tuned in, I am using the Wikipedia entry on Wallace Beery — alleging that he was involved in the death of Ted Healy — as a way to explore Wikipedia’s fundamental problems with accuracy and delve into Hollywood myths.  This is a slow, paragraph by paragraph analysis and, yes, it’s tedious. I hope the research drudges in the audience will find it interesting.

Today we are going to look at the person who appears to be a main informant for the Forrester brothers’ book “The Three Stooges” in the Wallace Beery-Ted Healy yarn. It’s a fellow named Sam/Sammy Wolfe, born Samuel Glasser, who also performed as Sammy Glasser.

Wikipedia: Murder and Myth: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Part 7 | Part 8 | Part 9 | Part 10 

IMDB lists him in two 1937 films: “The Hit Parade” and “Swing It, Professor” as a member of the Gentle Maniacs with Paul “Mousie” Garner and Richard Hakins.

Let’s investigate The Times clips. This will be tedious. Very tedious.

Dec. 24, 1937: He is listed as Sam Wolfe in a story stating that he attended Healy’s funeral, but he is misidentified as one of the original stooges.

Dec. 24, 1937, Sammy Wolfe

In all the other clips he is called Sammy.

July 26, 1940:

imageJuly 26, 1940, Sammy Wolfe

image

He performed at the Cafe Lamaze, according to a March 13, 1941, ad.

On Sept. 2, 1941, he was mentioned in a review of “Fun for the Money,” a revue at the Hollywood Playhouse called called “A Grade B attraction with Grade A pretensions.”

On May 31, 1944, he was listed as performing in “Surprises of ’44.”

June 1, 1944, Sammy Wolfe

“Sammy Wolfe’s clowning, while recalling the Main St. emporiums [a reference to the downtown Los Angeles burlesque houses] also had its points.”

Nine years later, for New Year’s Eve, 1953, he performed here:

Dec. 30, 1953, Sammy Wolfe

Aug. 23, 1956:

image
Jan. 29, 1958:

Jan. 29, 1958, Sammy Wolfe

May 24, 1958, he performs in a Ben Blue show with Buddy Lester:

May 24, 1958, Sammy Wolfe

June 14, 1958, still at Ben Blue’s:

June 14, 1958, Sammy Wolfe

Sept. 20, 1958, at Ben Blue’s:

Sept. 20, 1958, Sammy Wolfe

Nov. 22, 1958:

Nov. 22, 1958, Sammy Wolfe

Feb. 21, 1959:

Feb. 21, 1959, Sammy Wolfe

March 12, 1959:

March 12, 1959, Sammy Wolfe

May 23, 1959: Hey look! It’s Ponce Ponce!

May 23, 159, Sammy Wolfe

Aug. 1, 1959:

Aug. 1, 1959, Sammy Wolfe

Aug; 15, 1959:

Aug. 15, 1959, Sammy Wolfe

Feb. 27, 1960:

Feb. 27, 1960, Sammy Wolfe

March 19, 1960:

March 19, 1960, Sammy Wolfe

Feb. 24, 1962:

Feb. 24, 1962, Sammy Wolfe
April 24, 1966, with Billy Gray:

April 24, 1966, Sammy Wolfe
Aug. 28, 1975, Sammy Wolfe
Aug. 28, 1975: Sammy Wolfe shows up in an audition for people who sound like Al Jolson to promote the rerelease of the 1946 film “The Jolson Story.” And no, he wasn’t a finalist.

June 29, 1977, he performed at the Mayfair in Santa Monica:

June 29, 1977, Sammy Wolfe
Aug. 20, 1979, he appears in “Go Like Sixty”:

Aug. 20, 1979, Sammy Wolfe

May 24, 1984, in a tribute to Turk Prujan:

May 24, 1984, Sammy Wolfe

Aug. 28, 1984 – only $5.50 and everybody gets a free bottle of shampoo.

image
image

And that’s everything I could find in The Times on Mr. Sammy Wolfe.

To be continued.

About lmharnisch

I am retired from the Los Angeles Times
This entry was posted in 1937, Books and Authors, Film, Hollywood and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Wikipedia: Murder and Myth — Part 11

  1. Eve says:

    I SO want to see”Mirthquakes of 1940, or, Nuts to You!”

    Like

  2. Randi says:

    Ponce Ponce, the zany busboy!

    Like

  3. Fred Frees says:

    I found your article on Sammy Wolfe very interesting. I knew Sammy personally, but not intimately. He was friends with my parents and I spent a lot of time at his home with his (then) young children, Melody and Richard, and his wife Doris. He was a very funny man, and he used to re-create some of the Stooges routines for us.

    Like

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