Omaha Mob Burns Courthouse, Tries to Kill Mayor Before Lynching Black

Sept. 29, 1919, Lynching


Sept. 29, 1919: A mob in Omaha sets fire to the courthouse after trying to lynch Mayor Mayor Ed P. Smith when he appealed for law and order. Rioters finally lynch William Brown, an African American accused of raping a white woman. Federal troops were sent to restore order.

Oct. 1, 1919, Lynching

Oct. 1, 1919: An editorial in The Times draws a novel parallel between lynching and union activists. Then again, in 1938, The Times editorialized against a federal anti-lynching law.

Oct. 6, 1919, Lynching

The women of Omaha support the lynching and refuse to apologize for nearly hanging the mayor. They say he should do more to protect their virtue.

About lmharnisch

I am retired from the Los Angeles Times
This entry was posted in #courts, Countdown to Watts, Front Pages. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Omaha Mob Burns Courthouse, Tries to Kill Mayor Before Lynching Black

  1. J in Pasadena says:

    Wonderful choice of a historical edition in these racially charged times. Does it really matter anything to mention lynching the African American man in the teaser to this page? Try 100 years ago, the stories might be more historically significant and less divisive.

    Like

  2. Stacia says:

    The Race Riots of 1919, in Omaha and elsewhere, were widespread and significant. It’s unfortunate that most of these incidents are largely forgotten and/or ignored, and I doubt most people have even heard of the Red Summer of 1919. Race riots were all too common in that era, and in some cases (the Tulsa riot of 1921) deliberate attempts were made to pretend as though the riots never happened.

    Like

Leave a Reply. Note: Your IP is logged with your comment so a fake name and email address are useless.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s