LAPD Scrapbook: Rodger Young Village

Rodger Young Village

I stumbled across this photo in going through the LAPD scrapbooks at the city archives. This is Rodger Young Village, built for returning veterans due to the acute housing shortage in Los Angeles. This site is now occupied by the Autry museum.

About lmharnisch

I am retired from the Los Angeles Times
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31 Responses to LAPD Scrapbook: Rodger Young Village

  1. Benito says:

    Recently saw “Miss Grant Takes Richmond” [1949] on cable. This comedy revolves around the acute postwar housing shortage, and how Lucille Ball and Bill Holden make it worse, before making it better. PS Those look like really lousy Quonset huts.

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    • lmharnisch says:

      During World War II and after, the University of Arizona erected Quonset huts on the old polo field and later on they became “housing” for married students, called Polo Village. I’m sure they were all torn down years ago. I still see Quonset huts in the L.A. area, but not terribly often.

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    • Don Highman says:

      they really were not as bad as the pic shows. I was there for three months in 1946 visiting my parents.

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      • Don Highman says:

        I remember a young lady (Lynn Lytle) that lived to huts away. She took my brother Bill and me horse back riding and entertained us while we vacationed in Rodger Young village the summer of 1946.

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      • lmharnisch says:

        Thanks for sharing!

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      • Armond Neal says:

        My family lived there when I was 3 – 4 years old. Hard to believe but I have explicit, clear memories of that place. Granted, they are those of a child from an idyllic, fairly carefree time. My first of two sisters was born there, we experienced an earthquake, I saw my first snake, I remember going to the public plunge, Travel Town – as I type this more recollections are being triggered. Some not so great memories are now coming back to me, but still I think of it as generally a wonderful period and place to be a kid.

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  2. Sherry Ramirez says:

    I spent my first couple of years at Roger Young Village after I was born in Glendale, California. My parents then bought a Veterans house in North Hollywood for $2,500. And wondered if they could afford the $25.00 house payments.

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  3. John Scanlon says:

    I remember at the age of four my first day moving into our hut. I wanted to help but was told to stay out of the way and that would be help enough. Nothing but good memories of the village and the people who made it a great place to live.

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    • lmharnisch says:

      Thanks for sharing!

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      • brandy says:

        my name is brandy hanna i lived in rodger young village from 1947 to 1952 with my father john hanna, my mother marjory and brothers jeffrey and joe, and sister kevin our address was 1169. my dad was just back from the south pacific. my older brother jeff and i played all over the park. my dad worked at the village market. i loved growing up there.

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  4. Mary says:

    My family-mom, dad, jerry, timmy my two brothers and I lived in the village from about 1946 to about 1952. I remember we lived a great life between the old zoo and travel town. We would go into the hills and as children lived the adventure. Roger Young Village was the best place to start life.

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  5. CHARLES PAT SPENCER says:

    The village life brings back great times in my life. We lived in the village until the summer of 1952. Being able to walk to the zoo, which was never closed . The archery range, hiking in the hills etc.

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  6. Gary Cash says:

    We lived at 1213 Roger Young Village from 1946 (I was 5 and my brother was 7) until my father died in a motorcycle accident in 1950 and we returned to our birthplace, and grandparents home, in Bell, CA. It was a great place to live and full of children to pal around with. My brother and I took advantage of the ready access to Griffith Park for hikes and visits to the old zoo. The center of entertainment for kids was Rainbow Field, located at the end of the sidewalk that ran down the center of our quonset hut complex. It was used for all sporting activities and holiday events. The school was nearby and shopping was available at the shopping center which featured a Costco like market (food and sundry items were displayed in opened shipping boxes), a pharmacy, a barber shop and a theater. I can still remember the great snowfall in 1949 and walking to the shopping center through the thin covering of snow while bundled up against the cold.

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    • Jane Martin says:

      Hi Gary you still out there!!! I lived at 1212!!!

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    • Sheryl Roscoe says:

      I thought the snowfall was 1948 but it could easily have been early winter 1949. What fun! I am enjoying reading the postings. I remember the movie theater and the polio scare. Those memories are lumped together because my mom would no longer let us go to the movies on Saturday for fear we’d contract polio. The doctor made a house call or two. There was a dentist and I hated going there. Lots of kids to play with and my parents made friends they kept for life. Our house number was 547 I think. (I should remember because it was painted on the back of my red wagon.) When my parents were able to do so, they bought a little bungalow in Burbank…the only house they ever owned.

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  7. mary says:

    I was just a baby living at Roger Young Village probably about 1950-52 but I remember going to the zoo. I have some pictures of my parent’s house with me in it. My parents always talk a lot about the village it was the best time of their lives.

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  8. Jeannie Smith says:

    I lived in the Roger Young Village from 1950 to 1952 with my 3 Sisters and a brother, don’t have a address and don’t remember it either. I do have several picture’s and today I have enjoyed reading all about it. I was four when we moved all of us kids had chicken pops. We were told that we had to move because it was sold and they were going to build Dodger Stadium there, can’t seem to find anything about that yet. My Mom was always talking about the place, she was a really good singer and made a few records while living in Hollywood growing up. Her Mom started “Bruce’s Merry Maker’s” that was my Mom’s maiden name. They would take new talent and sing on Military Bases for the USO during the War in 1942 to 1944. She stopped doing it to be a Mother and she was a good one to all six of us kids. There is only us kids left now but we had so many memories of our family’s on both sides and lots of picture’s. Just wanted to share. Jeannie

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  9. Janet Papkin says:

    My father, George Papkin, MD and my mother’s brother, Maxwell Kassel, MD were the family physicians in Roger Young Village from 1946 to 1953 (approx.). After my dad died in 1996, the Autry Museum was pleased to take his original medical office furniture. It probably exists somewhere in their basement. I just have fond memories of lots of other little kids, a peaceful neighborhood feeling. Those were the days family practitioners did everything including delivering babies, setting bones, removing tonsils and on & on.
    Janet Papkin

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    • Michael Matsumoto says:

      Dear Janet Papkin
      I happened upon your entry while looking through Rodger Young Village sites. Dr. Papkin was my doctor when I was a kid. My grandmother, mother and her siblings all lived in the Village. The Village was also my first home after I was born in 1952. My grandmother and mother really though a lot about Dr. Papkin, and I went to him for immunizations and the sort. Just thought I would drop you a line to let you know your father was an important part of my family life while living in the Village and for some years after.

      Mike Matsumoto

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    • Catherine Cramer says:

      Janet I found your name while doing research on the Case Study House your folks lived in in 1948. Could you tell me how long they lived in the house, was looking for ownership change. Great that this beautiful home is still standing in pretty original condition. you can reach me at cfw61@yahoo.com. I found an article about your dad trying to save a little boy in the neighborhood when he became buried in a hole. unfortunately the little boy didn’t survive, but your dad tried. Thanks for any information!

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      • Jeannie D. Smith says:

        This is Jeannie Smith Madian name is Lusk, I lived there from 1948 to 1952 when my Dad John and Mother Doris, had to move with my 3 Sisters and a brother all under the age of 7, when we had to move. So not sure if it was my Dad who tried to save a boy, because it was never talked about. I have pix’s of us moving from there and a few pixs outside. I don’t remember it but my Mom told me a lot about Roger Young Village, my Dad was in the Navy at the time. Not sure I could help you but it fun meeting someone that lived there. Our Parents are gone now and just lost my Little Sister December 10. Thanks for writing, Jeannie Lusk Smith

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    • Sheryl Roscoe says:

      I went to see Dr. Papkin for years and years. I’d forgotten he was our doctor in RYV. We continued to go to him after we moved from the village and lived in Burbank. One of the doctors made a house call in RYV when my younger sister was sick. I can still picture it.

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  10. Violet Staley says:

    My name is Violet Staley and my family lived in Rodger Young village when I was born. I’m trying to learn more about it. Who was Rodger Young? My birthday is March 13, 1953. The rest of the family has passed…..I can be reached at violetstaley@gmail.com We live in Maryland and are a retired military family. God bless you!

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  11. My name is Ben Talley. I lived in Rodger Young Village from 1946 to 1950. I lived with my father Ed, my mother Winn and sister Leslie in No. 1141. Brandy Hannah and I probably played together, as she says above, all over the park. My first big memory was scooping snow in a bucket from in front of our hut to make a snowman (1949). loved growing up there.

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    • John Brendan Hanna ( Brandy) says:

      I lived in Rodger Young Village from 1946-1952. My dad was in the navy. We lived in hut 1169. My dads name was John Patrick Hanna. I’m Brandy

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      • Jeannie D. Smith says:

        That’s cool my Dad John Howard Lusk was also in the Navy at that time and I lived there from 1948 when I was born to 1952 when we moved to Covina, CA. there were 5 of us the oldest was my brother he was 5. My Mom Doris Lusk had her hands full we were not very far apart in age. I don’t remember living there but have a lot of pictures. Jeannie Lusk Smith now.

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  12. Jane Martin says:

    1946 my family lived there…1212 was our number… how can I find the people that lived around you?? Paulnel was a boy I remember his moms name was Irene…

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  13. Mary Byrd Bowles says:

    My parents, brother and I lived in Roger Young Village when I was about 2 or 3-years-old after World War II, when housing was scarce. My Dad was either in or just out of the Navy. I remember how friendly everyone was. Also, I had a memorable 1st encounter with another little girl & we somehow got into a tiff about something & one of us ended up hitting the other over the head, which received a blow in kind & we both ended up crying for our Mothers. I also remember being punished for saying a “bad word”, but they wouldn’t tell me what it was, so I never learned what not to say anymore. I got lost one time, but a kind neighbor lady informed my Mother & so I survived. It was a time of great energy & optimism as the war was finally over.

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    • John Brendan Hanna ( Brandy) says:

      My name is John Brandy Hanna, I was born in 1944. We moved into Rodger Young Village in 1946, our address was 1169. We left in 1952. My father was in the South Pacific in WW2 his name was John (Truck) Hanna, my mother’s name was Marjory.

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  14. Kim Tosch says:

    Hello, my name is Kim Tosch (neé Kerger). I was born at home in unit 846 in November 1953. We were one of the last families to leave sometime around June 1954. My parents, Richard and Jean Kerger moved to RYV sometime in 1949 with my two older brothers Jay and Rick. Their third son, Craig, was also born in RYV (at home) in 1950. I obviously have no memories of my time in RYV, but my mother shared many wonderful stories and I have a few photos. I was wondering if there is somewhere to share these photos?

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  15. Barbara Cabot says:

    My name is Barb Yamadera Cabot. I lived in Roger Young Village from approximately 1948-1950. I found this article when i googled Roger Young Village and incredibly saw a photograph of myself (on the tricycle) and my brother standing next to me (he is the boy second from left). I remember going to ride on the little train at Griffith park. My family had moved from Texas and we lived in the Quonset hut until we moved to East Los Angeles where my parents bought a house. We didn’t have a t.v. and it was really big new when someone near us got a television and they set it up and everyone in the neighborhood would go over and watch t.v. for a little while. It was really something. Here is the link to the website from the Los Angeles Public Library where my brother and I are photographed. http://photofriends.org/the-small-town-in-a-big-city-life-at-rodger-young-village/

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