1944 in Print — Hollywood Gossip by Harold Heffernan, April 17, 1944

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April 17, 1944

Who is Harold Heffernan? He’s a new one on me.

HOLLYWOOD, Cal., April 17 – Friends of Steve Crane and Lana Turner say that it finally was a case of two ambitious people under one roof. Crane came to Hollywood believing he had leading man qualifications and was determined to carve out a career for himself.

On the same day Lana issued her announcement that everything was lovely, the studio (Columbia) where Crane is under contract slipped out the story of their latest break. Crane had already left home to reside with a friend. He couldn’t bear to read his wife’s protestations of bliss, so he broke the story.

“Only one girl in Hollywood history ever approached Lana for doing the unexpected,” said an old timer. ” Her name — Clara Bow.”

Also: Howard Hawks’ tip on how to get a throaty voice.

From the Miami News.

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1944 in Print — Hollywood Gossip by Louella Parsons, April 17, 1944

April 17, 1944, comics

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April 17, 1944

A VERY PRETTY COMPLEMENT HAS BEEN PAID Mrs. Lillian Fontaine, mother of Joan Fontaine and Olivia De Havilland, by Mark Dennison, who writes to say: “I should think Joan Fontaine and Olivia De Havilland should be terribly proud of their mother, who sometimes acts under the name of Kit Colvin. I saw her performance as Aunt Martha in a camp show of ‘Arsenic and Old Lace.’ She is so different from most movie mothers — so obviously well bred and not a stage struck, ambitious woman, but a charming older woman of beauty and as much talent as, if not more than, her daughters. I admire her for using her talent instead of just sitting back basking in their reflections I should think she would be wonderful in movies.”

From the Milwaukee Sentinel.

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1944 in Print — Hollywood by Sidney Skolsky, April 16, 1944

April 16, 1944, Skolsky

April 16, 1944

WAR NOTES OF THE WEEK: Errol Flynn purchasing a newspaper with the headline, “Chaplin Acquitted,” and saying to Pal, the newsboy on Sunset Strip, “I’m awfully glad to read this.”

From the Miami News.

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1944 in Print — Hollywood Gossip by Louella Parsons, April 16, 1944

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April 16, 1944

HOLLYWOOD, April 15 – “There is no happiness possible,” Myrna Loy said, “when two people have divergent interests. You do not think alike and you cannot find real congeniality or mutual enjoyment.”

That statement, following just a few weeks after an interview with Joan Fontaine, in which she told me “I am convinced happiness isn’t possible for two people in the same profession,” made me wonder which girl is right.

Myrna believes a husband and wife must be of the theater, and Joan believes it’s fatal to happiness to have two stars in one family. It’s not for me to analyze the pros and cons of these statements.

From the Milwaukee Sentinel.

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LAPD Parker Center Cop Shop Files: Sandra Bowers

Sandra Bowers

I was given a box of material that was cleaned out of the old press room at the LAPD’s Parker Center headquarters, sometimes called “the cop shop.” The box was a jumble of press releases, photographs, artists’ sketches and other items dating from the late 1960s to the early 1980s.

Before I tell you anything about this woman, take a moment and try to guess what her story is.

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Mary Mallory / Hollywood Heights — TCM Classic Film Festival Highlights the Glory Days of American Cinema

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Carl Davis conducts an orchestra for “Why Worry?” at the TCM festival. Photograph by Tyler Golden / Turner Entertainment Networks.

 



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lending popular, timeless films with bountiful celebrity appearances, the TCM Classic Film Festival gloriously salutes the epoch of classic American filmmaking from the 1920s through the 1960s during its four-day stay in Hollywood. As in past years, the 2014 festival celebrated iconic cinema moments and glamorous, larger than life personalities in a joyous presentation of beloved motion pictures, geared to those who live in places where classic films are rarely presented on the big screen or feature celebrity appearances.

Turner smartly carries attendees back in time by organizing the festival around the historic built environment of Hollywood, in the actual movie palaces and streets through which legendary stars shaped film and cultural history. The festival employs such famous, striking locations as the El Capitan, Egyptian, Ricardo Montalban and TCL Chinese Theatres as film venues, with the legendary Roosevelt Hotel serving as festival headquarters, just as it did as Hollywood’s party central from the 1920s through the 1950s.

Mary Mallory’s “Hollywoodland: Tales Lost and Found” is available for the Kindle.

 

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1944 in Print — Hollywood Gossip by Louella Parsons, April 15, 1944

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April 15, 1944, Louella Parsons

April 15, 1944

EIGHTEEN YEAR OLD PATRICIA MUNZEL*, the singing thrush from Spokane, who got herself into the Metropolitan by winning an audition, has a Hollywood job. She is signing a contract with Jack Warner that will pay her in the neighborhood of $50,000 a picture. He is now looking for stories for her. The state of Washington is very proud of their songbird, who is very young to sing operatic roles.

*This is Patrice Munsel, who was recently featured in Life magazine, if you’ll recall.

From the Milwaukee Sentinel.

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1944 in Print — Hollywood by Sidney Skolsky, April 15, 1944

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April 15, 1944

Some quotations from the Motion Picture Herald, including this about “Princess O’Rourke.”

I played this fine picture on Sunday-Monday to just fair business and had more raves about it than anything I played in years. Maybe  it was the title that kept them away. I really exploit my pictures, using four weekly newspapers, 100 tack cards and 1,000 heralds; plus a public address system. If the preview had a hillbilly chirping “Coming Round the Mountain” or something, maybe that would have got them. My patrons like corn, green, ripe, in muffins, cans or jugs, and I simply have got to give it to them and that’s what they are going to get from now on. This picture business is getting me, or has it got me?

From the Miami News.

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Black Dahlia: Lily DuTertre and Wikipedia

Lily Dutertre,

Unless you prowl the outer fringes of the publishing industry, you may have never heard of Lily DuTertre, who is an avid compiler of “high quality Wikipedia articles” into books. Like this one on unsolved murders, selling for $26.68.

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Movieland Mystery Photo ( Updated + + + + )

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This is the 1972 film “Pulp,” starring Michael Caine.

Notice that imdb is not always reliable: “Michael King is a seedy writer of sleazy pulp genre novels under a half dozen sensational pseudonyms whose ambition is to dictate 10,000 words per minute to stenographers a la Earle Stanley Gardner.”

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Mary Mallory / Hollywood Heights — Play ball! Motion Picture Studios Play Baseball

Selig Baseball Team
The Selig baseball team, courtesy of the Collections of the Margaret Herrick Library



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ong before there was radio, television, the Internet, social media, computer games or rotisserie leagues, major league baseball dominated the American landscape. For decades, it filled newspaper sports pages, led social chatter, taught teamwork and sportsmanship and trimmed American waistlines. More Americans played baseball than any other sport into the middle of the 20th century.

In many ways, baseball shaped American culture: sublimating individual play into teamwork, democratizing and integrating citizens, giving hope for the future, offering a chance at the American dream. Baseball represented the national pastime, and America itself. In 1888, Walt Whitman pointed out, “I like your interest in sports — ball, chiefest of all — base-ball particularly: base-ball is our game: the American game: I connect it with our national character.” “Baseball in America” states that Mark Twain called it “the very symbol, the outward and visible expression of the drive and push and rush and struggle of the raging, tearing, booming 19th century.”

Mary Mallory’s “Hollywoodland: Tales Lost and Found” is available for the Kindle.

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Ghost Bike — Pasadena

Ghost Bike

This is one of the “ghost bikes” that have cropped up around the Los Angeles area as memorials to bicyclists who have been killed.

Steve Lopez writes about ghost bikes.

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1944 in Print — Hollywood Gossip by Louella Parsons, April 11, 1944

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April 11, 1944

HOLLYWOOD, APRIL 10 – So many movies are mentioned for Cary Grant that when I hear he is to make a picture I say, “Does Cary know it?” This time he does know he is to star in “The Greatest Gift,” an original by Phillip Van Doren Stern, for Charlie Koerner bought it with the popular Mr. Grant in mind.

Clarence Nash, the voice of Donald Duck, visits Milwaukee and talks with columnist Buck Herzog.

From the Milwaukee Sentinel.

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1944 in Print — Hollywood by Sidney Skolsky, April 11, 1944

April 11, 1944, Coke

April 11, 1944

HOLLYWOOD, April 11 — Greer Garson’s underwear scene in “Mrs. Parkington” is giving the Hayes office a problem.

From the Miami News.

 

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1970s VHS Nostalgia — ‘Saturday Night Live,’ 1978

Saturday Night Live, 1978

I recently watched an episode of “Saturday Night Live” (guest star Jill Clayburgh) that I taped in 1978, and I found rather sad. Out of the four people in this skit, only Bill Murray is still alive. John Belushi, Clayburgh and Gilda Radner are all long gone.

And then there’s this:

'Saturday Night Live'

'Saturday Night Live'

Belushi gets a fix from Jane Curtin in a satiric ad for “Nutrifix.”

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1944 in Print — Life Magazine, April 10, 1944

Life magazine, April 10, 1944

Losses of Aircraft, 19 4

April 10, 1944

Life’s cover story is Air Chief Marshal Arthur T. Harris, who backed the theory of mass bombing. The movie of the weeks is “Buffalo Bill,” starring Joel McCrea.

Life visits the home “in the majestic setting of California’s San Gabriel Valley” of Disney artist Ward Kimball, who is giving a party featuring his Grizzy Flats Railroad, which he keeps on his two-acre lot.

Courtesy of Google Books.

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1944 on the Radio — ‘The Lone Ranger’

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April 10, 1944: Return with us now to those thrilling days of yesteryear! “The Lone Ranger.” Courtesy of otronmp3.com.

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Books From the Slush Pile: ‘Kitty Genovese’ by Catherine Pelonero

Review Copies

The reject pile! Aspiring authors, avert thine eyes!


This is a sample of review copies that are cast aside in bins to be rummaged through by the staff. Usually they are contemporary genre fiction (“50 Shades of Stealing Maps for the OSS/CIA/NSA/FBI Written by Tom Clancy From Beyond the Grave”), self-help books (“Lose Those Stubborn Last 50 Pounds While Raising Young Einsteins in Five Days!”) and scholarly works (“The Socio-Cultural Effect of the Introduction of the Crimped Bottle Cap in the Belgian Congo.”)

But occasionally there are books that seem somewhat interesting. At least interesting enough to lug back to the Daily Mirror HQ. Because it’s sad to see them junked by the cartload.

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This week’s subject is “Kitty Genovese,” by Catherine Pelonero, which looks fairly interesting.
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1944 in Print — Hollywood Gossip by Louella Parsons, April 10, 1944

April 10, 1944, Ted Gale

Here’s another political cartoon by Edmund Waller “Ted” Gale, formerly of The Times, who moved to the Examiner. “There’s a Burma Girl a-Settin’ ” refers to the poem “Mandalay” by Rudyard Kipling.

April 10, 1944, Louella Parsons

April 10, 1944

JUST THE DAY BEFORE JOAN BLONDELL signed her contract to play Aunt Sissy in “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn” she took her two children, Norman and Ellen, to the beach and got a terrific sunburn. I talked with her Friday and she was applying every known remedy to her face to try to get it in shape before she starts at 20th. Joan and her suit for divorce against Dick Powell will be filed this week. I understand she will ask for custody of the children, although that is only hearsay. Dick is still living in the house, but there is no chance of a reconciliation.

From the Milwaukee Sentinel.

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1944 in Print — Hollywood by Sidney Skolsky, April 9, 1944

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April 9, 1944

Sidney Skolsky says: In “Objective Burma,” there is a soldier named Cesar Negulesco who is described as being “very concerned about his lack of experience with women,” which is a rib directed at wolf Jean Negulesco.

From the Miami News.

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