Lincoln’s Assassination Remembered, April 14, 1915

April 14, 1915, Lincoln Anniversary

April 14, 1915, Lincoln Anniversary

Eve Golden poses an interesting question: How did America observe the 50th anniversary of Lincoln’s assassination?

The answer is that the ceremonies were quite muted compared to today’s observations on the death of President John F. Kennedy. President Wilson ordered flags flown at half-staff in memory of the slain president.

The next day, The Times ran two accounts by people who were in Ford’s Theater the night Lincoln was shot, Herbert M. Nogle and Lt. Charles H. Jones.  One story noted that the occasion was the first time, as anyone could remember, that the anniversary of a president’s death was observed.

April 14, 1915, Lincoln Annivesary

April 15, 1915, Lincoln Anniversary

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About lmharnisch

I work at the Los Angeles Times
This entry was posted in 1915, Civil War, Politics, Theaters and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Lincoln’s Assassination Remembered, April 14, 1915

  1. Eve says:

    Wow, ask and I shall receive–thanks!

    I had a friend who was born in 1893, and she knew people who were there the night Lincoln was shot. I guess that makes me two people removed?

  2. DeweyWebb says:

    Far fewer TV shows as I recollect

  3. B.P. says:

    As I researched this story a week ago for my web site, Lincoln’s 50th anniversary coverage was as you say “muted.” Most newspapers thought their “eyewitness account” to the shooting may be from one of the only living witnesses to the shooting. People’s lifespans were shorter and newspapers and magazines didn’t check with each other to corroborate reports. Also Lieutenant Jones whose eyewitness story is told in the L.A. Times, varied in details over the many years he retold his account of the assassination.

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