Men 45-64 Register With Draft Boards

April 26, 1942, Comics

April 25, 1942, Draft Registration

April 26, 1942: Men between the ages of 45 and 64 form a line a block long outside the draft board at 329 W. 2nd St. to comply with a new registration order.

The men would be called upon to serve in civilian jobs rather than in uniform, The Times says.

Among the first to register was one local draft board’s examining physician, Dr. Frederick L. McLeod, who was 63. “This is an all-out war we’re having,” he says. “We’ve got to get behind it. I think everyone should be registered — including women.”

The Ice-Capades of 1942 is at the Pan-Pacific.

Gag writer Wilkie Mahoney gives a brief explanation of humor in Philip K. Scheuer’s Town Called Hollywood.

April 26, 1942, Draft Registration

April 26, 1942, Draft Registration

April 26, 1942, Draft Registration

April 26, 1942, Ice Capades

April 26, 1942, Town Called Hollywood +

April 26, 1942, Town Called Hollywood

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About lmharnisch

I work at the Los Angeles Times
This entry was posted in 1942, Comics, Film, Hollywood, World War II and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Men 45-64 Register With Draft Boards

  1. dorfgog says:

    “There were numerous sidelights to the far-flung listing of nature [sic] men ready to do their part in World War II.”

    Just when did we start referring to World War II as “World War II?” World War I was known as “The Great War” before World War II, so when were the terms first used?

  2. airbeagle says:

    The war itself is said to have officially started on the morning of Sept. 1, 1939. Ten days later, Time magazine became supposedly the first to use the term “World War II,” or at least the first in print. The reference came in an article in the magazine on Mon., Sept. 11, 1939 which started:

    “World War II began last week at 5:20 a. m. (Polish time) Friday, September 1, when a German bombing plane dropped a projectile on Puck, fishing village and air base in the armpit of the Hel Peninsula.”

    It seems that after that time, usage of the term, as well as the discontinuation of “The Great War” term for World War I, too off.

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