Explosion in Caltech Secret Project Kills 1, Injures 6

March 28, 1942, comics

March 28, 1942, Caltech Blast
March 28, 1942: A fiery explosion during a secret experiment at the Kellogg Radiation Laboratory kills Raymond L. Robey and injures six others. Robey was thrown 50 feet by the force of the explosion, which scorched the four-story building, The Times said.

Charles Cummins, one of three telephone workers who were repairing a cable outside the building, was credited with helping to pull Robey from the laboratory. The Times later reported that before he died, Robey told investigators he didn’t know what caused the explosion, which was ruled an accident.

Hollywood Boulevard osteopath William H. Kanner is charged with performing an abortion after aircraft worker Delmar Marshall, 24, attacked him with a monkey wrench and accused him of making improper advances to his wife, Louise, 19. Kanner denied performing an abortion and said he had been treating the woman for an infection. Pharmacist Milton Niemitz was also charged for allegedly recommending Kanner to the Marshalls.

On Main Street, “Valley of the Nudists” is at the Liberty and the Aztec has an “All Colored Revue.”

March 28, 1942, Abortion

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March 28, 1942, Caltech Blast

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About lmharnisch

I work at the Los Angeles Times
This entry was posted in 1942, Abortion, Art & Artists, Comics, Crime and Courts, Hollywood and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Explosion in Caltech Secret Project Kills 1, Injures 6

  1. A ‘powder vault’ inside a radiation lab in 1942. Had the Germans known the story, they might have put two and two together. Even if the secret project was not connected to nuclear physics. (Cue Arte Johnson) “Very interesting…”

  2. Earl Boebert says:

    Cal Tech was a major conventional ordinance research center in WWII under the leadership of Charles Lauritsen. This (and other) incidents lead to the movement of the research to China Lake, where I spent many a day dealing with things that went boom.

    Cheers,

    Earl

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