U.S. Moves to ‘War Time’

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Feb. 9, 1942: It’s a sad day at the Daily Mirror HQ. No more Jimmie Fidler.

The U.S. moves to Daylight Saving Time “for the duration,” which will last until six months “after the day America wins the war,” The Times says.

You’ll find lots of African Americans in The Times – if you look at the “Situations Wanted” listings in the classified ads. Hm. One job seeker specifies “Gentiles.”

G.K. has a feature on Victor Mature: “Victor doesn’t like being likened to Valentino and isn’t in fact like him…. Is buying Valentino’s house for the view.”

Feb. 9, 1942, Help Wanted

Feb. 9, 1942, Daylight Saving Time
Feb. 9, 1942, Victor Mature

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About lmharnisch

I work at the Los Angeles Times
This entry was posted in 1942, African Americans, Art & Artists, Columnists, Comics, Film, Hollywood, Jimmie Fidler, Religion, World War II and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to U.S. Moves to ‘War Time’

  1. Sam Flowers says:

    We always tell Smokie, our hound dog looking Weimaraner, that he is “handsome in a Victor Mature sort of way.” I guess that means V.M. is “handsome in a Weimaraner sort of way”.

  2. sherry smith says:

    I’m gonna miss Jimmie Fidler.

  3. Eve says:

    Among my mother’s papers was a card from the 1950s, advertising a cleaning service whose slogan was “Pleasant Colored Girls Always Smiling.”

  4. Moving the clocks forward was supposed somehow to improve war production by providing more daylight hours, but I’m convinced it was a ploy to remind the public constantly that we were at war. It was in fact called “War Time”. Surely it would have had an initially discombobulating effect on everyone’s circadian rhythms to wake up at the “wrong” time. Moreover, radio stations always announced the time at station breaks, an ever-present reminder, e.g.: “KFI, Los Angeles, Earle C. Anthony Incorporated. It’s 7 o’clock, Pacific War Time.”

  5. Mary Mallory says:

    Fidler was fun, I’ll miss him. That Daylight Savings Time really stuck around for a long while, didn’t it?

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