Nazi Swastika on Hollywood Hills!

Sept. 7, 1941, Swastika
Sept. 7, 1941, Pant Pant
Image: “I guess I’m a fool,” she panted. Credit: This Week magazine, Los Angeles Times


Sept. 7, 1941:It’s Sunday in Los Angeles, and although Pearl Harbor is three months away, concern about the impending war is everywhere. Someone even changed a “V” for victory to a swastika  on the hills  over what is now the John Anson Ford Amphitheatre, which was then the site of the “Pilgrimage Play.”

There are few recognizable titles among the bestsellers of the day: James Hilton’s “Random Harvest,” William L. Shirer’s “Berlin Diary” and Perhaps A.J. Cronin’s “The Keys of the Kingdom.” The rest have gone to the Zombie Reading Program.

On the radio: the Rev. Bob Schuler at 8:45 a.m. on KMTR; Sister Aimee Semple McPherson at 10:30 a.m. and 7 p.m. on KFSG. Then there’s Gene Autry on KNX at 2:30 p.m.; and Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy at 4 p.m. on KFI.

Jimmie Fidler says of a rumored change of management at a studio:

Producers are too afraid of being ousted to attempt anything but carbon copies of proven hit pictures…. Writers are too busy looking about for new jobs to do anything really creative. Directors are too eagerly currying favor with the new sovereign to stand up for their own ideas. Everyone, in short, devotes 90% of his energy to placating the potential head-lopper-offer and only 10% to his job. No one is sure of himself!


Sept. 7, 1941, Swastika

Sept. 7, 1941, Bestsellers

Sept. 7, 1941, Radio Dial

Sept. 7, 1941, Jimmie Fidler

Sept. 7, 1941, Jimmie Fidler

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About lmharnisch

I work at the Los Angeles Times
This entry was posted in 1941, Books and Authors, Film, History, Hollywood, Music, Radio, Religion, World War II and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Nazi Swastika on Hollywood Hills!

  1. Mary Mallory says:

    Well, Fidler’s comments about studios could stand in for today. Whenever a new studio head takes over, oftentimes department heads loyal to the previous regime are also let go. Producers and studios today are afraid to approve anything unless it’s a sequel, remake, or based on a very popular book/cartoon, that’s why there’s so little original work.

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